Briefing note on Concern’s women’s social and economic rights programme

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Briefing note on Concern’s women’s social and economic rights programme

27 February 2015

Engaging men is one part of Concern's women's empowerment programme in Tanzania. A growing body of evidence has affirmed both the importance of engaging men in gender equality as well as the impact of programmes that target men in gender-specific and gender-transformative ways.

An increasing body of research and programming is affirming that boys and men experience pressure to live up to social norms of what "real men" should be and do.

A young Tanzanian father holds his child while talking to friends outside his home. Photo by Mike Goldwater/Concern Worldwide

This programme works with men to demonstrate how they can benefit from gender equality and accepting non-violent and more equitable versions of what it means to be a man.

The process has built on developing men’s higher levels of emotional intelligence so they can now verbalise how they are feeling. Men in many communities talked about the relief that the changes have brought to their lives.

Implemented in 40 villages in Tanzania, this approach is part of an overall programme aimed at advancing women's involvement in decision-making in the househould and community.

Read a paper on the aims, challenges and positive outcomes of this programme in the resource below.

Download a copy of this resource

A young Tanzanian father holds his child while talking to friends outside his home. Photo by Mike Goldwater/Concern Worldwide

Briefing note on Concern’s women’s social and economic rights programme

Engaging men is one part of Concern women's empowerment programme in Tanzania. A growing body of evidence has affirmed both the importance of engaging men in gender equality as well as the impact of programmes that target men in gender-specific and gender-transformative ways.
  • Briefing Note on Concern’s Women’s Social and Economic Rights Programme