Community Resilience to Acute Malnutrition: Evidence from Chad

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Community Resilience to Acute Malnutrition: Evidence from Chad

28 March 2017

Concern Worldwide initiated a Community Resilience to Acute Malnutrition (CRAM) programme in the Sila region of eastern Chad in late 2012 as a three year pilot funded primarily by Irish Aid.

Overview of the CRAM programme

The programme was designed to take a more holistic approach to addressing poverty and vulnerability.The pilot also presented an opportunity to test and generate learning around Concern’s emerging approach to building community resilience.

As the name suggests, the programme specifically aimed to reduce the high and persistent levels of acute malnutrition observed among children in Goz Beida sub-prefecture in Chad as a proxy indicator of improved resilience. After five years of supporting a series of short-term emergency interventions in the area, Concern felt that a more multi-sectoral programme was needed to improve the nutrition and wellbeing of Goz Beida’s population.

Yaya Maha Giriye with daughter Yassira Ousaman (2 years) who was diagnosed with severe malnutrition in Goz Beida Subprefecture, Sila region, Chad in 2014. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.

Funding and research partnership

In a context that traditionally attracted only piecemeal emergency funds, Irish Aid’s multi-annual funding provided an ideal opportunity to design and implement such a programme. Irish Aid was also keen to invest in a strong evaluation and research component to strengthen the evidence base for resilience programming. A research partnership with the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University’s School of Nutrition Science and Policy was established to support the evaluation and research component.

Evidence of change 

The evaluation of the CRAM programme indicates that an integrated, multi-sectoral programme such as CRAM has the potential to positively impact acute malnutrition and stunting in children.CRAM's ability to prevent an increase in acute malnutrition in programme areas, while levels increased significantly in non-programme areas during the same period is a considerable achievement.The impact on stunting is also a somewhat striking result and offers hope for similarly challenging contexts in the Sahel and beyond.

Both the evaluation brief and full impact evaluation report can be downloaded below.For anyone that would like more documentation on the programme contact Concern.   

Download a copy of this resource

Yaya Maha Giriye with daughter Yassira Ousaman (2 years) who was diagnosed with severe malnutrition in Goz Beida Subprefecture, Sila region, Chad in 2014. Photo: Jennifer Nolan / Concern Worldwide.

Community Resilience to Acute Malnutrition: Evidence from Chad

The impact evaluation indicates that an integrated, multi-sectoral programme such as CRAM has the potential to positively impact acute malnutrition and stunting in children.