Conflict seriously threatens global hunger battle reveals 2015 Global Hunger Index

You are here

Conflict seriously threatens global hunger battle reveals 2015 Global Hunger Index

12 October 2015

According to the Global Hunger Index released today, armed conflict is seriously threatening the global fight against famine and severe hunger. The report jointly published by Concern Worldwide, the International Food Policy Research Institute and Welthungerhilfe measures levels of hunger across the globe.

Global Hunger Index 2015. Photo credit: Panos / Sven Torfinn, 2003.

Despite considerable progress over the past decade hunger levels in 52 of 117 countries in the 2015 Global Hunger Index remain “serious” (44 countries) or “alarming” (8 countries). The Central African Republic, Chad, and Zambia had the highest hunger levels in the report.

Chief Executive of Concern Dominic MacSorley who will speak at the international launch of the Global Hunger Index in Milan today says:

This report is a wake-up call for the international community. There is a common misperception that famine is caused solely by climate change but increasingly conflict has become a major contributor to severe hunger and famine. Concern staff working in the Central African Republic, Chad and Syria are witnessing the serious impact of conflict on hunger on a daily basis. Today’s Index demonstrates that the countries with the highest and worst GHI scores tend to be those engaged or recently emerged from war.

The time has come for the international community to make conflict prevention, mitigation, and resolution a much higher political priority. Diplomatic muscle and political will is urgently needed to prevent appalling levels of poverty, suffering and horrific brutality that seem commonplace in too many of today’s conflicts. Without peace, ending poverty and hunger by 2030 will never be achieved.

Welthungerhilfe President Bärbel Dieckmann goes on to say:

More than 80 percent of those affected by armed conflict stay within their countries. They are the ones who suffer most from severe food insecurity. We need to do more to support these people and to help restore their livelihoods. However, unless we address the root causes of armed conflict, the progress made in reducing hunger will not last.

The two worst-scoring GHI countries, Chad and Central African Republic, both experienced violent conflict and political instability in recent years. In contrast, in Angola, Ethiopia, and Rwanda, hunger levels have fallen substantially since the end of the civil wars of the 1990s and 2000s.

Download a copy of this resource

Conflict seriously threatens global hunger battle reveals 2015 Global Hunger Index

According to the Global Hunger Index, armed conflict is seriously threatening the global fight against famine and severe hunger.