Kenya: Registration guidelines for alternative provision of basic education and training

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Kenya: Registration guidelines for alternative provision of basic education and training

25 February 2016

This landmark report is the culmination of twelve years of advocacy by Concern for the provision of education to slum children in Kenya.

Beverlyne Owiti works diligently in class at the Brilliant Academy, a school built by  Concern Worldwide, perched on a hillside in Nairobi’s Mathare slum. Photo taken by  Concern Worldwide.

We’ve been advocating for many years for access to improved quality education for slum children. The introduction of Free Primary Education in 2003 by the government of Kenya was an important step in the process.

Prior to this, there were over 1,500 informal schools in the slums, run by charities or private individuals at a fee.  These schools were unregistered, unregulated and the quality was not standardised; people were struggling to afford low quality education.

Concern worked with the Ministry of Education, the ‘complementary’ teachers sector, parents, the UN, churches and charities to reach this significant point in education in Kenya.

This publication, issued by the Ministry of Education in Keyna, is an important achievement and helps pave the way for improved education services for the poorest in Kenya.

Click the link below to download the publication.

Download a copy of this resource

Kenya: Registration guidelines for alternative provision of basic education and training

This report is the result of twelve years of advocacy by Concern for the provision of education to slum children in Kenya. This report is the result of twelve years of advocacy by Concern for the provision of education to slum children in Kenya.
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