Research on indicators for urban emergencies in Kenya

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Research on indicators for urban emergencies in Kenya

06 February 2015

Born out of the growing interest in predicting and averting urban food security crises. Concern Worldwide has implemented the “indicator development for surveillance of urban emergencies” (IDSUE), a study funded by the United States Agency for International Development – Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance.

The population of Kenya has grown by ten million within a ten year period making it the seventh most populous country in Africa and the third most populous in the East African region. 

Children play in the Korogocho Slum in Nairobi. Photo taken by Concern Worldwide, Kenya.

For many rural to urban migrants, urban living is not necessarily better living. More than half of Kenya’s urban residents live in poverty; they dwell in peripheral urban areas on meagre incomes and in unsanitary conditions. The central question that IDSUE seeks to address is: How do we know when a situation has gone from chronic poverty to an acute crisis in an urban slum?

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Here’s an excerpt from the document: 

Urban informal settlements are often overlooked due to a lack of reliable census data. As a result, vulnerable urban populations are often overlooked by the state as well as humanitarian and development actors. While there is a National Drought Management Authorityto address drought emergencies in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs) of Kenya, a similar institutional “home” for urban emergencies does not exist.

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Research on indicators for urban emergencies in Kenya

This study was instigated by a growing interest in predicting and averting urban food security crises.