Shining a light on developing countries using solar power

You are here

Shining a light on developing countries using solar power

05 May 2015

For over 1.5 billion people around the world with no electricity, night-time means either darkness or the dim glow of an unhealthy kerosene lamp or candle. Such poor-quality lighting has a dramatic impact on health and educational opportunities, and on safety and security.

Rob Kearney is a big fan of Concern Worldwide’s use of solar light technology in developing countries and in emergencyresponse contexts. An important aim of the International Year of Light will be to promote the use of portable solar-powered high-brightness LED units in regions where there is little or no reliable source of light.

Access to electricity can be a serious challenge in all of the countries in which Concern works – particular in the aftermath of a disaster.

Solar light and solar charging of other vital equipment can be a key component in trying to keep communities functioning. Indeed, in some cases, it can be the difference between life and death.

Concern is regarded as a leader in the usage of solar technology and has implemented large-scale community lighting projects in Haiti and Liberia. In many cases, these lighting solutions also provide mobile phone charging points.

Read about Concern's partnership with Cork County Library for International Year of Light

For more information, download the full resource at the link below.

Download a copy of this resource

Shining a light on developing countries using solar power

Concern is regarded as a leader in the usage of solar technology and has implemented large-scale community lighting projects in Haiti and Liberia. In many cases, these lighting solutions also provide mobile phone charging points.