SUNDARI: protecting the biodiversity of the Sundarbans by reducing human pressure

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SUNDARI: protecting the biodiversity of the Sundarbans by reducing human pressure

03 June 2015

Sundarbans is the largest mangrove forest in the world, and is at risk due to climate change factors and indiscriminate exploitation of its resources. Concern’s SUNDARI project seeks to address this issue.

Concern Worldwide is working to improve biodiversity in Bangladesh’s Sundarbans mangrove forests. Photo taken by Mahmud / Concern Worldwide.

The southwest coastal zone of Bangladesh is particularly vulnerable because of its low-lying elevation, and higher population density. Up to 3.5 million people in Bangladesh are dependent on the forest to maintain their lives and livelihoods.

Concern Worldwide’s “Sundarbans Development and Alternative Resources Integration” (SUNDARI) project seeks improve biodiversity of the Sundarbans by reducing human pressure on its resources. This will be achieved by:

  • improving food security and reducing forest dependency of 25,000 people currently relying on the forest for food and income
  • increasing disaster resilience among 1,277 communities dependent on Sundarabans resources
  • protecting biodiversity by strengthening grass-roots institutions and improving co-management practices

This project began in 2012 and is supported by the European Union and implemented by Concern with field partnership of Jagrata Jubo Shangha (JJS) and Shushilan.

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Concern Worldwide is working to improve biodiversity in Bangladesh’s Sundarbans mangrove forests. Photo taken by Mahmud / Concern Worldwide.

SUNDARI: protecting the biodiversity of the Sundarbans by reducing human pressure

Sundarbans is the largest mangrove forest in the world, and is at risk due to climate change factors and indiscriminate exploitation of its resources. Concern’s SUNDARI project seeks to address this issue.