Philanthropy

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Philanthropy

When you become a major donor with Concern Worldwide you have the opportunity to make a real and lasting impact on the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable people in the world.

Ali Assen Ali, with two of his daughters, on his farm in South Wollo, Ethiopia.  Ali has been participating in a Concern programme that encourages farmers to grow alternative crops.  After three years, Ali has more than tripled his output of potatoes.

How you can give

Fund a specific project

At Concern we will work in partnership with you so that we can help find the right project for you.  Whether you have a personal connection with a country or area of work, want to fund an innovative pilot programme or simply give where the need is greatest, we have a project for you to invest in.  

Join the Concern Philanthropic Circle

Become a member of the Concern Philanthropic Circle and join together with other like-minded people to pool funds for maximum impact.  The Concern Philanthropic Circle is currently funding the Graduation programme in Burundi that is sustainably lifting people out of extreme poverty.  Learn more about this innovative and life changing programme here.

Emergency Response Fund

When disaster hits, it is imperative that we are able to reach people with aid as soon as possible.  By donating to our Emergency Response Fund, you will enable us to send out our rapid deployment unit within days, if not hours, of a disaster hitting.  This allows us to provide fast, effective disaster relief to the most vulnerable communities.


Contact

For donors in Great Britain, please contact Julia Czastka at [email protected]  

For donors in Northern Ireland, please contact Dawn Weir at [email protected] 


What you get in return

  • We will assign a dedicated member of staff to work with you and provide you with all the information you require throughout your time supporting Concern.
  • Bi-annual project reports that detail the progress and impact of your donation, including a financial report showing how your money is being spent.
  • Regular updates from the project, including photographs and case studies of the people and communities you are helping to support.
  • Invitations to a range of exclusive events where you can learn about the latest developments at Concern while networking with like-minded supporters, senior staff members and inspirational speakers.
  • An opportunity to travel overseas and visit the project you are funding so you can see the difference you are making first-hand.

 

How your donations help

Large donations help us to plan ahead. This means we can achieve sustainable and effective change in the lives of the people we work with. You can choose to make a one-off donation or provide funding over a number of years. Your support will go directly to helping the most vulnerable people living in the most fragile places in the world.

Previous programmes funded by major donors include:

Pavement Dweller Centres in Bangladesh

Moni visits Karwan Bazaar Pavement Dweller Centre where her two children are staying while she works. Moni sells vegetables at a market in Dhaka - the business was started after receiving a grant from Concern.

Moni visits Karwan Bazaar Pavement Dweller Centre where her two children are staying while she works. Moni sells vegetables at a market in Dhaka - the business was started after receiving a grant from Concern. Photographer: Abbie Trayler-Smith, May 2016, Bangladesh / Panos Pictures for Concern Worldwide.

The number of extreme poor in Bangladesh, estimated at 2.8 million, has grown exponentially as more people move to urban centres in search of work.  At the very lowest end of the urban poverty continuum in the country are the pavement and squatter dwellers. They live on the streets, sleeping under plastic sheeting, or just a piece of clothing hung over their head. Renting a room in a slum is beyond their means.


This programme focuses on improving the lives of the urban extreme poor in Dhaka. Pavement Dweller Centres (PDCs) provide social protection, a safe place for children during the day to undergo formal education and a permanent address to register for national ID cards. The programme also runs livelihood interventions through skills training, small grants and links to employment opportunities.

Quote from Moni, beneficiary of the urban programme in Bangladesh:

“I came to Dhaka when I was young, really young, I don't remember my age. My parents came looking for work. I don't remember life before. I was married when I was 10. Now, I am proud [my children] can get day care at the Pavement Dweller Centre and when they are older, they will get to go to school - this is not something I had but something they will have and this makes me proud. Before we only had one meal a day. With my business, I can afford three meals a day and I can save. The money I have left is reinvested in the business.”

Improving Child Health in Niger

Nadiya Imbrahima (18) with her 7 month old daughter, Loubaba, at the Concern Worldwide supported health clinic. Loubaba has clear signs of severe acute malnutrition, caused by a lack of food and compounded by illness.

Nadiya Imbrahima (18) with her 7 month old daughter, Loubaba, at the Concern Worldwide supported health clinic. Loubaba has clear signs of severe acute malnutrition, caused by a lack of food and compounded by illness. Nadiya doesn’t have enough breastmilk to sustain the baby and so Loubaba is receiving outpatient treatment of therapeutic food. Mogheur Health Centre, Commune de Bambaye, Tahoua, Niger. Photo: Jennifer Nolan, 2016

 

Niger is among the countries with the highest maternal, infant and child mortality rates in the world: up to 14,000 women die each year giving birth and nearly 13% babies born do not reach their fifth birthday. Malnutrition is a major factor contributing to child mortality as more than half of children under five are chronically malnourished.

 

This project successfully improves the health and nutritional status of children under five through recruiting and training volunteers in the community called Mother Leaders.  These volunteers provide basic healthcare and advice to mothers in remote areas, who are unable to access formal health facilities.

 

Concern in Great Britain: 

Julia Czastka at [email protected]  

Concern in Northern Ireland: 

Dawn Weir at [email protected]