Stevens Bangura, Headteacher Sheka, Magborkeh Village, Poli Chiefdom, Tonkolili District. Photo: Charlotte Woellwarth/Concern WorldwideStevens Bangura, Headteacher Sheka, Magborkeh Village, Poli Chiefdom, Tonkolili District. Photo: Charlotte Woellwarth/Concern WorldwideStevens Bangura, Headteacher Sheka, Magborkeh Village, Poli Chiefdom, Tonkolili District. Photo: Charlotte Woellwarth/Concern Worldwide

Livelihoods

Livelihoods

Why livelihoods? Secure livelihoods offer the extreme poor a pathway to forge their way out of poverty. According to the most recent figures, 736 million people in the world live on less than $1.90 a day. That equates to approximately 10% of the world’s population living below the global poverty line.

We implement our livelihoods programmes in some of the poorest and most vulnerable places in the world. Extremely poor people in developing countries face many risks, a number of which are associated with climate change. An increase in the incidence and severity of climate-related disasters are negatively impacting on crop yields and the availability of food for subsistence farmers. At the same time, people are increasingly migrating to crowded urban areas in search of more secure livelihoods and are facing increased competition for income-earning opportunities.

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Seraphin Mukalay, 51, a beneficiary of Concern Worldwide’s Food for Peace program, is seen on his farmland close to the village of Kakyinga, Manono Territory.
Seraphin Mukalay, 51, a beneficiary of Concern Worldwide’s Food for Peace program, is seen on his farmland close to the village of Kakyinga, Manono Territory.
Sori Gollo (21) with her son in Kalacha, Marsabit. She is enrolled in Concern's Livelihood programme and has been to grow a healthy and varied kitchen garden in Chalbi desert.
Sori Gollo with her son in Marsabit, Kenya. She is enrolled in Concern's Livelihood programme and has been to grow a healthy and varied kitchen garden in Chalbi desert.
Concern programmes are fighting poverty by supporting small business owners like Ruth.
Concern programmes are fighting poverty by supporting small business owners like Ruth.
Gisele draws water from a pump installed in her village with help from Concern.
Gisele draws water from a pump installed in her village with help from Concern.
Nazma Begum started Swan farming with the livelihood support at Jatrapur, Kurigram and adding income to her family. Photo: Concern Worldwide
Nazma started swan farming with support from Concern and adding income to her family.

A closer look at our livelihood programmes

We aim to contribute to lasting improvements in the income and food security of extremely poor people through the implementation of high-quality, multi-dimensional programmes. Here we spotlight two of our approaches.

Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA)

Climate change is now an accepted reality – the earth’s climate is warming. More frequent and longer-lasting periods of extreme temperatures are now a reality, as are more frequent and less predictable flood events and dry-spells.

The communities that we work with are on the front line of these climate effects. Whether it be the Sahelian zones of Chad and Niger, or the flood plains of Bangladesh, most rely heavily on farming, fishing and livestock-rearing for their livelihood and find themselves in an increasingly precarious position. For example, many of the farmers we work with must now plant their seeds two or three times in a year because rains fail during the early stages of crop growth and final yields are harshly compromised.

We're supporting communities to adopt Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA) practices which adapt their farming systems to become more resilient to a less predictable climate. The practices we are promoting include the diversification of crop varieties, increasing access to improved farming skills and technologies, and strengthening links with the private sector to facilitate access to agricultural inputs from seeds, to new equipment such as solar water pumps.

In Kenya, in 2021, we reached over 6,400 farming households with training on nutrition sensitive and climate smart agriculture which enabled them to produce a diverse range of crops, contributing to a significant reduction in childhood malnutrition.

Graduation programme

Apoline Niyosenge is taught how to wash her hands properly by Concern community worker Abel Bamwisho, DRC. Photo: Pamela Tulizo

Help those in need across the world

  • Our mission is to permanently transform the lives of people living in extreme poverty.

  • When an emergency strikes we are among the first on the ground.

  • We go to the ends of earth to deliver aid where it's needed most.

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