Project Sponsorship

Concern Worldwide works with some of the poorest and most vulnerable people in 25 of the world’s most fragile states. 

Our development work addresses the multi-dimensions of poverty and is tailored to the needs of the people we support. We want the way you support Concern to be as tailored to you as Concern’s projects are to our beneficiaries around the world.

Supporters able to give a minimum gift of £10,000 are more than donors, they are investors in people and in development. By donating a transformational gift like this, you will help make a significant impact on people’s lives and bring about sustainable and lasting change.

We have a large portfolio of projects that need funding and our major gifts team will work with you, to find the right opportunity for you.

How to fund a project

Contact our team to discuss your requirements, they will be happy to provide details on the areas of our work that match your interests.

Once our team have all the information they need, they will come back to you with several proposals for you to choose between. 

These proposals will include:

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Information on the country, project and the beneficiaries

Your proposal will provide background information on the country and specific area you will be funding.

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What the impact of the project will be

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A budget showing how your money will be spent

Rohingya men rebuilding their tents before the monsoon arrives, Jamtoli, Ukhiya. Photo: Abir Abdullah/Concern Worldwide
Rohingya men rebuilding their tents before the monsoon arrives, Bangladesh.
15 year old Liliana Mwenza wa llunga says the new water point and other interventions by the Concern-led WASH consortium in her village, Mulombwa, has had a very positive impact on family life. Photo: Kieran McConville/ Concern Worldwide
Liliana Mwenza wa llunga at a new water point constructed by a Concern-led WASH consortium.
Baby Kali (18 months old) in Filtu Regional Hospital, Somali Region, Ethiopia. Kali is being treated for severe acute malnutrition with the support of International NGO Concern Worldwide. Photo: Jennifer Nolan/ Concern Worldwide
Baby Kali is being treated for severe acute malnutrition with the support of Concern.
SILK group near Mabayi, Cibitoke. Jeanne D’Arc Niyingabiye is a beneficiary of the Graduation Programme, and a member of this group. Throught the support of this programme Jeanne can send her three children to school. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith / Concern Worldwide
Jeanne D’Arc Niyingabiye is a beneficiary of the Graduation Programme.

What you will receive in return

Our major gifts team can offer you a bespoke package depending on your needs and requirements.  Among other things we can provide:

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Bi-annual reports

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We provide detailed update reports twice a year, showing the progress of the programme, including any challenges and the impact the programme is having on participants.  

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Financial report

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Stories

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Travel opportunities

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Invites

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Hassana's story

Hassana Abdourahamane, is a member of a women’s community farming group in Kosoma. The women grow vegetables including onions, tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, cabbages and aubergines on land that they have rented together.

Hassana Abdourahamane, together with other members of a community farming group in Kosoma. The women grow vegetables including onions, tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, cabbages and aubergines on land that is loaned to them. Initial seeds and training were provided by Concern but the women are now self-sufficient because they are able to sell some of what they grow. Photo: Chris de Bode/ Panos Pictures/ Concern Worldwide
The garden is a 20-30 minute walk from our village. The land is loaned to us during the dry-season. During the rainy season the owner uses the land but we are allowed to come and look after the Moringa and collect the leaves
Hassana Abdourahamane

The initial seeds and training were provided by Concern.

During the first harvest we were surprised that this was the result of our efforts – these were things we had never seen or grown before. It was like we were dreaming when we saw what we had grown. Other people not involved in the project come and watch what we are doing and are inspired by us.

Hassana Abdourahamane

The women are self-sufficient now, they sell a portion of the crops and spend the profits on new seeds and use some of the money to pay younger people from the village to help work on the harder areas of ground.

Want to discuss becoming a member of the Concern Philanthropic Circle?

How money is spent

83.3%
Overseas programmes
Overseas programmes
12.8%
Fundraising
Fundraising
3.5%
Policy, advocacy & campaigning
Policy, advocacy & campaigning
0.4%
Governance
Governance
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