Partner with us

Partner with us

Why partner with us? Partnerships between the private sector and aid agencies like Concern can have a significant global positive impact. When we partner with companies, the results are transformational - for both the business and the beneficiaries we work with.

When you partner with us, our dedicated team will work with you to create a shared value partnership and engage your company’s employees. Depending on your company’s objectives, we will identify project sponsorship opportunities that are aligned with your mission and values.

There are a number of ways to get involved. You can:

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Fund a project

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Work with us to fund a specific project. You can choose to make a one-off charitable donation, or provide funding over a number of years to help sustainably lift some of the world’s poorest people out of poverty.

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Select us as your charity partner

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Display the brand

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Make a corporate donation

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Whether you want to support a specific project or become a charity partner, we will work with your organisation to ensure we deliver a partnership that makes a positive, lasting impact on your work as well as ours.

Children from Satla Bheel village enjoy drinking water from the water plant system installed by Concern. Photo: Black Box Sounds/ Concern Worldwide.
Children from Satla Bheel village enjoy drinking water from the water plant system.
14 month old Anger Adim Garang, a boy, is one of twins admitted to the outpatient therapeutic program (OTP) run by Concern in Maduany in Aweil North, South Sudan. Pictured here with Monica Mawien a supervisor with the Concern community nutrition team. Photo: Kieran McConville/ Concern Worldwide
Nutrition staff in South Sudan weigh Anger Adim Garang. Photo: Kieran McConville/ Concern Worldwide
Lamartiníere Rose-Laure (32) taking part a professional skills training course, part of the “Building Hope & Opportunities in Haiti” integrated urban program in Cité Soleil, Port au Prince. Photo: Kieran McConville/ Concern Worldwide
Lamartiníere Rose-Laure taking part a professional skills training course.
After Nasibo Asuran gave birth to her eight-month-old daughter, Ramah – a Concern trained community health volunteer – was sent to ensure that her baby had a healthy start to life. Photo:  Peter Caton/2017/Kenya
After giving birth, Nasibo Asuran was sent a Concern-trained community health volunteer.

What you will receive in return

When you choose to work with Concern to help tackle extreme poverty, you will receive:

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Support

We will provide dedicated fundraising support throughout your partnership with us.

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Promotion

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Fulfilment of corporate social responsibility

Hassana's story

Hassana Abdourahamane, together with other members of a community farming group in Kosoma. The women grow vegetables including onions, tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, cabbages and aubergines on land that is loaned to them. Initial seeds and training were provided by Concern but the women are now self-sufficient because they are able to sell some of what they grow. Photo: Chris de Bode/ Panos Pictures/ Concern Worldwide
Hassana Abdourahamane, together with other members of a community farming group in Kosoma.

Hassana Abdourahamane is a member of a women’s community farming group in Kosoma. The women grow vegetables including onions, tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, cabbages and aubergines on land that they have rented together.

The garden is a 20-30 minute walk from our village. The land is loaned to us during the dry-season. During the rainy season the owner uses the land but we are allowed to come and look after the Moringa and collect the leaves.

Hassana Abdourahamane

The initial seeds and training were provided by Concern.

During the first harvest we were surprised that this was the result of our efforts – these were things we had never seen or grown before. It was like we were dreaming when we saw what we had grown. Other people not involved in the project come and watch what we are doing and are inspired by us.

Hassana Abdourahamane

The women are self-sufficient now, they sell a portion of the crops and spend the profits on new seeds and use some of the money to pay younger people from the village to help work on the harder areas of ground.

Last year we had no support from Concern and we continued with what we had learnt. We are proud that we have learnt something and can continue on our own.

Hassana Abdourahamane

Want to discuss supporting Concern?

How money is spent

83.3%
Overseas programmes
Overseas programmes
12.8%
Fundraising
Fundraising
3.5%
Policy, advocacy & campaigning
Policy, advocacy & campaigning
0.4%
Governance
Governance
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