Cathreen Francisco demonstrates composting goat manure. Photo: Chris GagnonCathreen Francisco demonstrates composting goat manure. Photo: Chris Gagnon

Help families in Malawi prosper

Giving £12

Giving £12 could provide a 13-day supply of therapeutic food for a weak and malnourished child

Giving £35

Giving £35 could help people in Malawi access training to start a farming business so they can provide for their family

Giving £120

Giving £120 could provide a family with emergency food and a home garden kit, to start growing their own vegetables

Giving £3 monthly

Giving £3 a month could provide a baby with life-saving therapeutic food for four weeks

Giving £10 monthly

Giving £10 a month could provide two babies with life-saving therapeutic food for seven weeks

Giving £20 monthly

Giving £20 a month could provide four babies with life-saving therapeutic food for seven weeks

In Malawi, climate change is threatening the livelihoods of millions of families, leaving many at risk of hunger.

Over 80% of Malawians earn their livelihoods from the land. They are vulnerable to the impact of climate change, including flooding, droughts and natural disasters. Without enough food or income, families may go hungry, putting their children at risk of becoming malnourished.

We are working with the most vulnerable households, to help them adapt to the changing climate and enable their livelihoods to thrive. Your support can help more people find opportunities to build sustainable livelihoods, so they can build brighter, healthier futures for their families.

Will you support our work to help people in Malawi stay healthy and prosper?    

£35 could help people in Malawi access training to start a small business and provide for their family

Oliver and her husband James stand among their corn, which is growing strong thanks to the tips and techniques they learned at Concern-led agricultural training sessions. Photo: Chris Gagnon
Oliver and her husband James stand among their corn, which is growing strong thanks to the tips and techniques they learned at Concern-led agricultural training sessions. Photo: Chris Gagnon
Oliver and her husband James proudly display the 108 bags of corn they harvested last year – they need 40 bags to feed their family with, so the rest will be sold for profit. Photo: Chris Gagnon
Oliver and her husband James proudly display the 108 bags of corn they harvested last year – they need 40 bags to feed their family with, so the rest will be sold for profit. Photo: Chris Gagnon

Oliver and her husband James grow corn in Vikiwa Village in Phalombe, Malawi. In 2021, after attending farming training sessions organised by Concern, they increased their yield from 10 bags of corn to 108.

The results are almost unbelievable. With this amount of corn, their family will no longer go hungry – and they have plenty left over to sell. Oliver plans to reinvest the profits into their farm and buy some goats, whose manure will help them grow even more crops. 

In 2020, we provided more than 124,000 people in Malawi, including Oliver and James, with training in environmentally-friendly and climate-resilient agricultural techniques.

We also helped 858 households to tackle hunger and poverty by offering them business skills training and support to start their own businesses. They’re now making a sustainable income for their families by selling products, including home-grown vegetables and hand-made soap, in the local markets.

Four ways your donation can help people in Malawi

How money is spent

85.5%
Overseas programmes
Overseas programmes
11.5%
Fundraising
Fundraising
2.7%
Policy, advocacy & campaigning
Policy, advocacy & campaigning
0.3%
Governance
Governance
A flood plain in Nsanje, Malawi. Photo: Chris Gagnon / Concern Worldwide / Malawi

Help tackle poverty in Malawi

  • £35 could help people in Malawi access training to start a small business

  • One in two Malawians are living below the poverty line

  • In 2020, we helped nearly 32,000 households implement climate-smart farming techniques

Donate now
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