Our policy work on nutrition

Our policy work on nutrition

Concern is committed to ensuring that the poorest and most vulnerable people in the world receive the right food and nutrition to lead healthy lives and reach their true potential, giving them a way out of poverty.

Extreme poverty and hunger are inextricably linked.

Hunger and malnutrition are important drivers of extreme poverty. Good nutrition enables individuals to survive and reach their optimal physical and brain potential. As a result they are equipped to seize the right opportunities to secure a healthy future. On the other hand, malnutrition holds people and nations back by perpetuating vulnerability, poor health, and lowered productivity. This also weakens their resilience to shocks and crises.

Evidence shows that improving nutrition can help boost annual earnings of individuals and nations by 10%, if not more. Nutrition is also proven to be one of the best development buys, offering 16 in return for every pound invested. Improving nutrition and food security among the world’s poorest and most vulnerable countries and people is not just a question of human rights; it is crucial to accelerate progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

What we do

Our work is focused on ensuring evidence from the ground is used to inform the right investments, policies, and programmes targeting populations that face the greatest burden of hunger and malnutrition. We amplify the impact of our advocacy by working closely with civil society allies through coalitions such as the International Coalition for Advocacy on Nutrition (ICAN), Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Civil Society Network, and the Alliance 2015 partnership.

14 month old Anger Adim Garang, a boy, is one of twins admitted to the outpatient therapeutic program (OTP) run by Concern in Maduany in Aweil North, South Sudan. Pictured here with Monica Mawien a supervisor with the Concern community nutrition team. Photo: Kieran McConville/ Concern Worldwide
Nutrition staff in South Sudan weigh Anger Adim Garang. Photo: Kieran McConville/ Concern Worldwide
Halimo Hassan (1 year and 2 months) and mother Khayro Ali Hassan (30) in a remote health centre in Filtu, Somali Region. Halimo is being treated for severe acute malnutrition with the support of International NGO Concern Worldwide. Photo: Jennifer Nolan/ Concern Worldwide
Halimo Hassan (1) in a health centre in Filtu. Photo: Jennifer Nolan/ Concern Worldwide
Hundreds of people waiting for a weekly water truck to arrive in Kersa Dula, Somali Region, Ethiopia. The people here get an average of 20 liters of water per person for one week, very far below the UN standards. Photo: Jennifer Nolan/ Concern Worldwide
Hundreds of people waiting for a weekly water truck to arrive in Kersa Dula. Photo: Jennifer Nolan
Concern staff members distribute Emergency Health and Nutritional Response. Somali Region, Ethiopia Photo: Jennifer Nolan/ Concern Worldwide
Concern staff members distribute Emergency Health and Nutritional Response.
The nutrition counsellor of Concern’s Jamtoli OTP centre Saleha Akter Jhuma is checking the health condition of Uzair (not real name). He came OTP for follow up check-up. When Uzair came to Jamtoli OTP centre, he was severely malnourished and had very low appetite. After taking the nutritious diet for three weeks, Uzair is a healthy baby now. Nutrition counsellor Jhauma and Uzair’s mother Salma (not real name) both looks very happy to see his improved health condition. Photo: Tariq Adnan/ Concern Worldwide
The nutrition counsellor at Jamtoli OTP centre at work. Photo: Tariq Adnan/ Concern Worldwide

What we're calling for

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More investment in food and nutrition security

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Despite its role in building a strong foundation for individuals and nations to survive and thrive, nutrition remains massively underfunded as a global issue. We are calling on donors, and governments of countries with high rates of malnutrition, to allocate more resources to tackle hunger and malnutrition through Official Development Assistance (ODA) and domestic budgetary allocations respectively.

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Better programmes for the greatest impact

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Prioritisation to reach the furthest behind first

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